What Is Collision Insurance?

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What Is Collision Insurance?

<lingo>Collision insurance is insurance that helps pay for damages to your vehicle if you cause an accident that damages it. The most common way collision insurance can work for you is by covering the damage to your vehicle if you backup or otherwise collide with something or someone. This type of policy is not mandatory but tends to be ideal for anyone who has a valuable vehicle and wants to have ample financial protection for that car. Collision insurance is a requirement if you have a loan on your car, and in most cases, if you are leasing your vehicle.</lingo>

Collision Insurance Clearly and Briefly Explained

Many people can benefit from collision insurance because it offers a high level of damage protection for their vehicle. It can help cover the cost of repairing your vehicle if you are in a collision with another vehicle or with an object, such as a tree, building, or pole. It also applies in situations where your car is rolling or falling over – if this is a single car incident.

<twitter>There are some things that collision insurance does not apply to, including any damage to your vehicle that is not a direct relation to driving the car.</twitter>

There are some things that collision insurance does not apply to, including any damage to your vehicle that is not a direct relation to driving the car. It does not cover storm damage, for example. It also only covers your vehicle, not that of any other vehicle involved in the accident. It only covers damage to the car as well, not your medical bills or claims made against you.

Most often, collision insurance limits should be set based on the value of your vehicle. Your car insurance agent will help you with this. Most often, this is based on the actual cash value of your car, but other options may exist.

This component of car insurance can help to cover the repair costs to your car after such an incident, minus any deductible you are required to make. If the car cannot be repaired, the insurer may elect to total it. In that case, it typically pays the value of the car at the time just before the incident occurred, not based on what you owe.

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