What is a No-Fault State?

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What is a No-Fault State?

<lingo>Most states in the country will assign fault for an auto accident, but there are about a dozen of them that are considered no-fault states. Some examples of no-fault states include Michigan, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, and Florida.
Specific no-fault rules and regulations can vary a bit from one state to the next, but in general, a no-fault state is one that does not assign fault to a single driver in a car accident. Instead, drivers must carry no-fault insurance that will pay for some or all expenses related to personal injury claims resulting from an accident.</lingo>

No-Fault States Clearly and Briefly Explained

Perhaps the most important characteristic of a no-fault state to be aware of from an insurance standpoint is that drivers in no-fault states are not permitted to sue other drivers as a means of recovering medical bills, lost wages, or similar expenses after an auto accident. Because no fault is assigned to either driver in the event of an accident in this state, neither driver is able to be held legally accountable for the other party's medical bills or similar expenses.

<twitter>Because no fault is assigned to either driver in the event of an accident in this state, neither driver is able to be held legally accountable for the other party's medical bills or similar expenses.</twitter>

Instead, drivers are expected to carry no-fault insurance that will pay out for these expenses, either partially or completely (depending on your coverage). In some states, there are limited exceptions to this and you may be able to bring a lawsuit forth against another driver if you have suffered from a serious injury, such as a bone fracture, disfigurement, or a substantial disability that lasts for 90 days or more.

In these instances, you will want to speak with an experienced auto accident injury attorney before moving forward. It is also important to understand that no-fault insurance only applies to bodily injury protection. It does not cover any damage done to another person's vehicle or to your vehicle in an accident. For this type of coverage, you will want to make sure you have property damage and/or comprehensive/collision insurance in place, which can provide you with additional peace of mind and protection.

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